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September 10, 2015 About the EUIPO

The sale of fake sports equipment costs legitimate EU manufacturers €500 million every year


The sale of fake sports equipment costs legitimate EU manufacturers €500 million every year...


The sale of fake sports equipment, such as footballs, sports helmets, tennis rackets, skis, gym equipment and skateboards, costs legitimate EU manufacturers €500 million every year.

A new study from the Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM), shows that the sales lost due to counterfeiting of sports equipment –not including sportswear– correspond to 6.5% of all sales in this sector across the 28 EU Member States.

The study also shows that approximately 2,800 jobs are lost in this sector throughout the EU, as manufacturers sell less than they would have done in the absence of counterfeiting, and therefore employ fewer people.

Every year, an additional €360 million is lost across the EU due to the indirect effects of counterfeiting of sports equipment – as manufacturers buy fewer goods and services from suppliers, causing knock-on effects in other areas.

Today's report, released by OHIM through the European Observatory on Infringements of Intellectual Property Rights,  also shows that up to €150 million is lost annually in government revenue throughout the EU due to this type of counterfeiting. This includes tax, social contributions and VAT which are not paid by producers and distributors of fakes.

The President of OHIM, António Campinos, said: "Every day, millions of people across the EU play and enjoy sport. However, very few of them know about the economic damage caused by counterfeit sports equipment in their own Member States, and across the EU as a whole. With this series of reports, we are investigating the effects of counterfeits in terms of lost revenue and jobs, sector by sector, to provide a complete picture for policy makers and EU citizens."

Today's report is the third in a series of studies undertaken by OHIM into the economic impact of counterfeiting in industrial sectors in the EU, in terms of job and revenue losses. In July, a report into the economic impact of fake clothes, shoes and accessories (including fake sportswear) was released, while in March, OHIM published the first study in this series, into the economic impact of fake cosmetics and personal care items. Each report centres on a sector known to be vulnerable to counterfeiting.

 


 
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